Chobits Book 6

Not only is there a summation at the beginning of this volume (cleverly fitting in with the computer theme by being framed as an email), but the first scene with Chi captures her basic conflict without seeming repetitive or familiar. As her experience with emotion grows, she continues to have questions about herself and her world.

The thing I like best about this book, though, is Plum, the adorable miniature computer. When she’s awakened by a phone call, she goes into a frenzy of activity, awakening another tiny, more traditional character. When she finishes her duties, Plum demands applause, causing the other computer to remark “and I thought Chi was as nutty as they come…all Hideki’s coms are insane!”

Chobits Book 6 cover
Chobits Book 6
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These little “laptops” provide a nice playful touch that lightens the major plotlines. In another setting, they’d be fairies or magical toys. I like that they’re allowed to be themselves, quirky and unusual, yet still get their jobs done.

After rescuing Chi from a kidnapper, Hideki has to deal with a friend’s emotional fallout. Both Hideki and Yumi worked for a baker who went so far as to marry his girl computer. After the computer died, the baker and Yumi fell in love, but Yumi is torn apart by the idea that she could never live up to an artificial being’s perfection.

The idea of never being able to compare to the beloved memory of a departed loved one is here given an updated twist by making the departed a computer. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t a true love, yet humans are able to move on and build new lives without giving up their memories.

It’s odd to see Hideki so skilled at giving romantic advice. He seems to be the prototypical nerd guy, interested in computers and porn, but he somehow manages to say the right things, even if he’s not aware that he’s doing so. I think it’s his good heart shining through, demonstrating his caring for his friends.

Book 6 is the most significant of the series so far, with various revelations finally making sense to the participants. I previously reviewed Book 3.

Similar Posts: Chobits Book 1 § Chobits Book 7 § Chobits Book 3 § Matt Baker: The Art of Glamour § Yakitate!! Japan Book 4

6 Comments

  1. >>The idea of never being able to compare to the beloved memory of a departed loved one is here given an updated twist by making the departed a computer. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t a true love, yet humans are able to move on and build new lives without giving up their memories.

  2. [For some reason only the section I'd copied and pasted from Johanna's original post made it into my comment - this is what I meant to follow on from it]:

    That’s really why I liked this series so much (after having my doubts in the first few chapters) – a lot of it is about different varieties of love, many of them with sad or painful aspects. Before she “dies”, for instance, the baker’s robot wife begins to lose her memory and act oddly: surely a metaphor for someone with Alzheimer’s, or mentally impaired. Clamp, then, is asking how you can continue to love someone who no longer exists as the person they were – a question more and more people have to answer nowadays.

    As for Hideki, at first his relationship with Chi seems to have a high squick factor (the, ahem, location of her On switch) but as soon as his reaction to a naked young girl throwing herself into his arms was to put some clothes on her I knew that the Awesome Foursome – excuse me, it’s *very* late at night… – were going to give the fanboys what they were panting for with one hand and take it away with the other: it’s very neatly done.

    I hope you post a review of the last volume – I’d be interested in knowing your reaction.

  3. Great thoughts, Jenny, thanks! (I suspect the comment box eats anything that begins with the left angle bracket because it thinks it’s an HTML tag, which is why the rest of your first post disappeared.)

    I have one more review coming of the series, for book 7. I never talked about book 8, I’m not sure why.

  4. Ed Sizemore

    Johanna, I hope you will decide to write a review for book 8. I am interested in your thoughts on the conclusion. I really loved the series, especially the ending.

  5. [...] I’m still unsure of just how this will all wrap up, but the tension between the admirable bits and the disturbing implications has driven me through 7 of the 8 volumes so far. I’m involved with the characters emotionally and the questions raised by the story logically, which makes for a enjoyable combination. I previously reviewed Book 6. [...]

  6. Your reviews have made me reconsider this series. I was never able to get past the “squick factor” to enjoy the series much. I do like the way CLAMP plays with fanboy cliche, but in the end, Chi is just too pliable for me to feel good about the relationship between her and Hideki (even though Hideki is a mensch for the way he does not take advantage of her innocence).

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