Tranquility Then and Now

Gail Simone will be writing a new WildStorm series called Tranquility about a superhero retirement community.

I wonder if they know that there was a previous comic series with that name? It was written by Fred Van Lente (currently writing hot indy title Action Philosophers) and drawn by Steve Ellis, and I quite enjoyed it. Since it was published in 1998, perhaps they think the title’s expired, or no one’s going to protect it (although it seems to be available as a Platinum Studios property (link no longer available)).

On another note, I’m looking forward to the Simone series because she says, in reponse to a question about whether her hero characters will be analogues of existing characters,

You know, I’m going to sound like a jerkette here, but I’m not a fan of that approach. Better writers than I have made wonderful stories with doppelgangers, but…personally, I hate it. I don’t want to read a story looking for the Z-universe Batman, or the Obscure comics version of Captain America. I think it’s cheating, and removes you from the story at the best of times. But, I’m nuts, and have an IQ of 34, I’m told, so maybe I’m wrong. It’d certainly be easier to just remake the JSA with new suits, but it’s not an approach I like at all.

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5 Responses to “Tranquility Then and Now”

  1. Lyle Says:

    Oh, goodness, that quote makes me adore Simone all the more.

  2. James Schee Says:

    I really enjoyed that Tranquility series, I wish they would have been able to finish the story. (or did they?)

    I’m sure with Gail writing it, that there will be some neat twists and turns.

    Yet it does seem interesting to see a series with senior citizens as its stars. Does that reflect the ever growing age of the current direct market comic buyers I wonder?

    Because it wasn’t that long ago when the companies seemed to be moving towards younger heroes or rmodernized classic ones, who they hoped would be more in tune with a younger audience.

  3. Johanna Says:

    There were only 4 issues out of a planned 12, so no, but what we got was satisfying and complete enough.

    Interesting speculation. I don’t think the age of the new characters reflects the market as much as the market’s concerns. Many baby boomers have reached the point already where they’re having to deal with aging parents and how best to care for them.

  4. James Schee Says:

    True, and thank you. I was a bit worried after I posted that it might have come off as “eww, who wants to read about senior citizens?”

    It is just interesting to me to see a focus on a segment of the populace that rarely gets any attention, especially in comics.

    I mean yes the JSA is supposed to be part of that age group, but more than half the current roster are newer versions, and the ones who aren’t have some “magical” reason to not be so.

    I find at times that comics, superhero comics especiall,y have such a stigma at times of being either for youths or those trying to relive/hang on to their childhood.

    That this book which seems like it will take a different approach could be interesting, since, as you say, it could reflect the new concerns a large part of the audience now faces.

  5. Zuda Announces First Winner, Competitors » Comics Worth Reading Says:

    [...] them from small press print projects, though. (And I’m thrilled to have the chance to see Steve Ellis’s art again.) These are the ones readers will be voting on next month, and they were also approached [...]

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