I’m Back! NY Comic Con Done

I survived the NY Con. I’m back home, very tired but happy. It went much better than I expected, given the potential horror stories, last year’s history, and my general fear of crowds.

It was wonderful to see so many old friends. The NY location and the book association brought out a lot of people I worked with at DC (almost 10 years ago now!), and it was terrific to say hi in person once again.

So many people have covered the show in such depth that I apologize for taking the easy way out by talking about what mattered to me instead of actual news. It was overwhelming — it really is like San Diego, only in a smaller space and with more emphasis on books, less on movies. The whole weekend was a blur, and I was very glad I had family events to go to in the evenings, because it was a nice change of pace and escape. I don’t know how people stayed for whole days — I left early both days I attended. Friday was especially hard, what with the trade-only section for six hours, and then another five with general admission.

I thought the show was nicely filled before they opened to the public. Once that happened, I did get caught in a crowd, when they were restricting access to the Artist Alley area. I went up to see friends, and I found myself unable to leave for 10 minutes just because the space was so crowded and no one was able to move. Mild panic!

(I later wound up helping the Baltimore Comic-Con guys give out Harvey Award ballots, and nothing will make you appreciate the extraordinarily wide aisles they use in their show setup like being constantly butt-bumped while trying to acquire comics.)

On the bright side, I saw the unpublicized Rob Walton (Ragmop) and got to chat with him about how terrific it was to see his work finally completed. Walt Simonson and Todd DeZago were sympathetic and refreshing as always. (They’re some of my favorite people — I usually see them when I’m frazzled, and they’re such a tonic, so welcoming and cheery.) Artists Alley overall was an odd mix, with “big names”, classic creators (such as Neal Adams and Jim Shooter), craft booths, up-and-comers, and minicomic artists. It needed much more space than it got.

On the main floor, I was pleased to get to see many West Coast publishers that don’t come to many other East Coast cons. I visited with Viz (giving away tons of copies of manga samplers as well as a tote bag that was a godsend while packing to come home), Tokyopop (I’ll be checking out Pantheon High), Del Rey (Kitchen Princess not only looks cute, it has exciting recipes!), Vertical (I’m curious about Apollo’s Song, an unusual work by Osamu Tezuka), and Fanfare/PonentMon, where I could try The Building Opposite. DC had CMX and Megatokyo samplers, too, as well as a preliminary version of The Plain Janes.

I also geeked out at the show — I was thrilled to have Alison Bechdel sign my copy of Fun Home and even add a sketch. I asked her when we might see the next Dykes to Watch Out For collection, and she said it would be longer than usual because she doesn’t have a publisher right now. I hope the delay isn’t too long!

Oh, and I shouldn’t forget to mention catching up with people I don’t see often enough in person. Buddy Scalera, for instance, used to be at Wizard Online when I was DC Online. Now he’s got a comic, 7 Days to Fame. T Campbell generously gave me a copy of his History of Webcomics book — he was there debuting Divalicious with artist Amy Mebberson, which looks fabulous.

I’m sure I’m forgetting people — my apologies. There’s more I want to mention, but sleep is very necessary at this point, and the Oscars are coming on. I haven’t even talked about how much I enjoyed being part of the blogging panel Heidi put together. (Thank you, Heidi!) Meeting Ron and catching up with Chris was great — but I’m running out of complimentary adjectives! I was honored, especially during the after discussion, when David Brothers said I was an inspiration.

I’m amazed that I got to do almost everything I had hoped or planned to at the show. It was a wonderful weekend. Thank you to everyone who made that possible.

Similar Posts: Two Last NY Con Notes § Links on the Chicago Con § Weekend LinkBlogging § Ed’s Saturday At Baltimore Comic-Con 2011 § Are You Exhibiting at Baltimore Comic-Con? Let Me Know


8 Responses to “I’m Back! NY Comic Con Done”

  1. Joshua Macy Says:

    I like Kitchen Princess, and am looking forward to vol 2. I haven’t tried any of the recipes, but they look plausible though maybe slightly difficult if you’re not a reasonably experienced cook. For instance, for the flan recipe it doesn’t really say anything about how to time it so the caramel sauce is ready when it’s time to pour the flan over it.

  2. Hal Shipman Says:

    This has nothing to do with comics, but I can help there. If you’re making a traditional flan, the caramelized sugar should be solid, cooled to about room temperature before you pour in the custard. If it’s hot, it will cook the custard that comes in direct contact with it before you even bake it, giving you inconsistent texture. And the secret to getting the most of the awesome post-baking caramel sauce when you serve the desert is to let it set in the refrigerator for two days after backing, if you can. Covered, of course.

  3. NEWS: New York Comic Con Wrap-up at Independent Propaganda Says:

    [...] Johanna Draper Carlson has a short-n-sweet report on the past weekend events. [...]

  4. Ali T. Kokmen Says:

    It was great to meet you in real live person, Johanna. Glad you found time to stop by!

    And, guys, thanks for all the kind words about KITCHEN PRINCESS and, perhaps more importantly, for the flan-tastic tips. By the way, if you want to see what came out of the (>ahem

  5. Ali T. Kokmen Says:

    Hmm…did that get a little truncated?

    What I mean to say, for all you flan-philes out there is that you can take a look here to see the “official” flan from the Del Rey Manga test kitchen.

    –ATK

  6. Ed Sizemore Says:

    Ali, I was glad I got to see you in person too. I liked the Superman bow tie. Thanks for the lollipops.

  7. Ali T. Kokmen Says:

    > Ali, I was glad I got to see you in person too.
    > I liked the Superman bow tie.

    Aw, thanks. Apparently the pattern was somewhat subtle; not a lot of folks realized the design…

    Then again, going by the “Picture of the Day” here my newfound penchant for wearing classy-but-nerdy ties at comics conventions is probably in no danger of being overlooked…

  8. More NYC Tidbits » Comics Worth Reading Says:

    [...] Things I forgot from my previous convention post: [...]

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