Booster Gold #4

A hoot. Booster Gold is the idiot sent to fix timestream problems because no else is willing to take such a scut job. Everyone in the comic makes fun of him. Then they make fun of everyone else, too. Booster’s curse is to be thought incompetent while really making the most heroic gestures of all.

Booster Gold #4 coverThis issue, Booster and his traveling partner Rip Hunter have run their time sphere into the Cosmic Treadmill… while Barry and Kid Flash Wally were on it. (Why haven’t I read about a timestream collision before? It’s goofy but twisted fun.) Barry and Wally are tight-ass old-fashioned heroes, while Skeets, Booster’s flying robot globe, snarks at him. For instance, after Booster figures out that they’re headed for a trap, he says, “I hate being right.” “At least it doesn’t happen often, sir,” replies Skeets, in Marcy-like fashion.

Turns out that Rex Hunter, some bitter kid-grown-up from the Time Masters series, and Supernova, gimmick from one of the recent interchangeable events, have teamed up to change history by eliminating heroes. As Barry says, “We’ve heard enough, Wally. These men are time travelers with insidious motives.”

I like that there are references to other comics everywhere in this book, but they don’t matter. It’s cool if you read, or even heard of, Time Masters, but if you haven’t, ok, you’re told that this is a former teammate now gone bad. If you do have more knowledge of superhero trivia, then you’ll find the line “Booster Gold? Way to aim high. Was Danny Chase unavailable?” hilarious.

No one in this comic is respect-worthy, so when they do refer to other events, it’s easy to ignore. And that’s all right, that they’re losers, because they’re still trying to do the right thing, in a much more mottled way than the simplified primary characters they interact with. But they don’t wallow in how difficult life is or how tough it is to live on the edge. There’s a lightness here that keeps the pieces working together.

Their missions are basic and easily understandable, not to mention sympathetic. Booster wants to save Blue Beetle from dying. To do that, they have to prevent another attack on a superhero. I don’t want to spoil it, but it’s a highly contentious event that I’m impressed they’re willing to tackle.

Booster Gold #3 coverI’m inclined to attribute all the bits I like to co-writer Jeff Katz, because I don’t care much for Geoff Johns’ work these days. Either way, it wouldn’t work as well as it does without the experienced art of Dan Jurgens and Norm Rapmund. This is the kind of superhero adventure I can really get into: creative, adventurous, moral, exciting, amusing.

The weirdest thing is, this isn’t even the best issue of the series so far. In issue #2, Booster faces off with Sinestro, which leads to Skeets ramming himself into the Lantern’s head while shouting “No man escapes me!” He’s yellow, you see, and Sinestro thinks he resembles a Manhunter. In issue #3, Booster gets drunk with Jonah Hex in some convoluted plan to keep Superman from being killed. Which is why they ran into the Treadmill this issue — Booster was driving the time sphere drunk.

Similar Posts: That Looks Interesting: Booster Gold, Wonder Woman, lots more § DC Spinner Rack: Teen Titans #89, Batman, Incorporated #1, Booster Gold #38, Tiny Titans/Little Archie #2 § DC This Week: Titans #3, WW #21, Batman Confidential #18, Booster Gold #10 § DC Spinner Rack: Zatanna 5, Batgirl 14, Justice League Generation Lost 11, Booster Gold 37 § All-Flash #1


7 Responses to “Booster Gold #4”

  1. James Schee Says:

    Okay good, I thought I was crazy about how much I was enjoying this series. Given the status of most things from DC, and Johns usual negative approach.

    It is a hoot to read though and I just love Booster and Skeets.

  2. Anthony Says:

    >>This issue, Booster and his traveling partner Rip Hunter have run their time sphere into the Cosmic Treadmill… while Barry and Kid Flash Wally were on it. (Why haven’t I read about a timestream collision before? It’s goofy but twisted fun.)<<

    An early 80′s Superman storyline featured a timestream-collision, with Superman and his younger self, Superboy, colliding while both were traveling through time (Superboy to a Legion meeting, and Superman into the past), with the result of their swapping minds with each other (16-year-old Superboy’s mind stuck in Superman’s body/time-era, and vice-versa)…

    Wasn’t “Time Masters” that series that claimed one could only use the same method of time-travel *once*, or some such nonsense? (Someone apparently didn’t tell Barry… ;-) ).

  3. Johanna Says:

    That’s why I love comics: bumping into someone will make you swap minds! I better be more careful walking down the street.

    And yeah, that was Time Masters. Co-written by now-Marketing VP Bob Wayne and sci-fi author Lewis Shiner. Available in TPB in February.

  4. Tommy Raiko Says:

    I remember reading Time Masters when it was first published and really, really, disliking it at the time. I remeber being really disappointed that although the miniseries promised to explain how time travel in the then-new post-Crisis DCU worked, whatever explanations it offered were highly unsatisfying. Plus the fact that the only real “rule” established was that only any person could only use a particular time-travel method once just struck me as a bad idea, if for no other reason than it meant that you wanted to do any extended time travel story, you’d probably wind up creating a whole bunch of one-off characters to use your time travel means.

    Now that I’m older, more seasoned, and less slavishly fanboy, I wonder if I’d enjoy the story more for its across-the-generations Illuminati plot (which, indeed, might fit in with a lot of today’s adventure stories. I mean, in a world where Nic Cage gets to do a sequel to National Treasure, anything’s possible.)

    Then again, I also think Time Masters was the story that made me think Vandal Savage was overused as a villain, so maybe not…

  5. Anthony Says:

    >>That’s why I love comics: bumping into someone will make you swap minds! I better be more careful walking down the street.

    Well, to be fair, it took some sort of anomaly in the timestream to cause Superboy and Superman to bump into each other and switch bodies. Completely scientific, I’m sure… :-)

    If interested, the story (which mostly dealt with Superboy-in-Superman’s body and amazed at the then-present day world/his future life) appeared in Superman #380-382, with the Superman-in-Superboy’s-body part in New Adventures of Superboy #38. Lois puts in heavy appearances/involvement in this tale (plus a cameo midway through by Lana)…

  6. Tomorrow’s Comics Today + Late Books » Comics Worth Reading Says:

    [...] for DC Comics, with the launch of Bat Lash, the last issue of Captain Carrot and the Final Ark, a Booster Gold issue, and another volume of Emma. Plus, I’m giving Wonder Woman another [...]

  7. DC This Week: Titans #3, WW #21, Batman Confidential #18, Booster Gold #10 » Comics Worth Reading Says:

    [...] did the fun in this book go? Now it’s all mucky trying to kill people jumping around in time stuff. It’s like [...]

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