Win a Copy of The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics

I recommend The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics to just about anyone interested in understanding visual storytelling (assuming you have a tolerance for today’s DC house art style, scratchiness and all). And thanks to random chance, I have an extra copy to give away!

To enter the contest, please leave a comment below telling me about the best example of visual storytelling in comics you’ve seen recently. A winner will be picked randomly from all entries on Thursday, October 10.

(U.S. addresses only, please. Winners will be emailed to confirm address. If email is not answered within 24 hours or a valid email address is not provided, a replacement winner will be selected. Your email won’t be used for any other purpose.)


13 Responses to “Win a Copy of The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics”

  1. Ursula Says:

    I’m not sure if this qualifies as very recent, but the best example of visual storytelling I’ve seen in a while was probably Infinite Vacation and its trippy panels. I’m glad the creators finally got to finish the series, and now there’s a hardcover trade I’ve got my eyes on.

  2. David Oakes Says:

    Chris Samnee on Daredevil. He has been using pictures to convey hearing and smell, as well as putting a new spin on the hoary “radar sense”.

  3. Jason Kimble Says:

    I’m not always fond of silent issue gimmick stuff, but I absolutely adored the “Pizza Dog” issue of Hawkeye (#11). I just thought the use of icons and layouts did a great job of both telling the story and expressing the character (insomuch as a hungry dog has one, of course).

  4. Aaron S Says:

    The best I’ve seen lately is the first issue of Trillium by Jeff Lemire. There’s several parts that just use imagery to build the exposition, but I feel like I could easily understand what Jeff was trying to say.

  5. Rita Says:

    Sean Gordon Murphy in “Wake”…but really, Sean Gordon Murphy on anything. Unbelievably powerful draftmanship that will sell any story.

  6. James Schee Says:

    Lazarus #3 the scene where Forever is being harassed by the soldier of another family. The silent eyes glance, body stance and movement between her and the other Lazarus was brilliant.

  7. Marty Yohn Says:

    I’m enjoying the clean lines, facial expressions, and sound effects of Yale Stewart’s web-comic JL8. He’s been very good at telling a story in it’s simplest terms.

  8. kris larsen Says:

    Sara Varon’s “Robot Dreams.” There is serious storytelling there under all of the cute pictures.

  9. SKleefeld Says:

    You know me: always up for comics-related contests! :)

    If I limit “recent” to the past week or so, I’ll point to the last few pages of the webcomic Unsounded in which creator Ashley Cope completely (but subtly) breaks out of “regular comic page” format and incorporates the entire web page design into the story. She’s done similar things in the past, but I think this time in particular is most significantly tied to the narrative.
    http://www.casualvillain.com/Unsounded/comic+index

  10. Andy Lee Says:

    Atomic Robo, not only genius writing, but genius story telling. Comedy, action, and drama around a robot created by Nicola Tesla and his science adventure team. Classic 3 panel reaction scenes, no pinups, lots of action…and science!

  11. Arion Says:

    Jamie McKelvie on Young Avengers. In issue #4 turns a double page spread into a game board, a picturesque sequence that shows Noh-Varr’s attack step by step in miniature, while spotlighting specific moments in larger frames on the contours of the page. This is a visual exercise that embraces comic books as a rich and complex medium, as an artistic expression that can be more powerful and dynamic than anything else, provided that the artists are willing to take risks and use their imagination. He has done amazing things throughout the series.

  12. Johanna Says:

    Thank you all so much for reminding me of some great comics (or introducing me, Kleefeld). A winner has been drawn and emailed.

  13. SKleefeld Says:

    You’re welcome. Figured that was the bigger point of your original question. :)

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