PR: What Not to Do: Undercutting Your Retail Partners

What exactly defines a release date? If a publisher says that they’re the only ones who can sell their product starting today, but any other retailer won’t have any stock until November, then is the release date today, or are they just making pre-sales (as comic publishers sometimes do at conventions) against a release date in November? I’m asking this question because I got this rather odd press release for the Grant Morrison: Talking With Gods DVD. Its message seems […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Badger Reviewers Into Ignoring You

I was really really tempted to bring the old “Stupid Publisher Tricks” label out of storage for this one, because boy, do they deserve it. I’ve talked before about how dumb it is to require reviewers to jump through hoops before you let them see your comic. I understand that some small companies may be paranoid about copies of their work getting put online for free, so they want to use DRM copies and individual secret passwords and other worthless […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Having a Useless Website

Brigid Alverson has written a wonderful rant about what journalists want from publisher websites, and how many fail at the basics. Here’s what any publisher site should have, inspired by her list: A page on each of your publications that contains the credits, a cover image (in a reusable form), the price, and the solicitation information. (Ideally, updated when you make changes.) A working search engine and understandable navigation. Contact information and basic company information. I like to know what […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Asking Reviewers to Jump Through Hoops

Got an email the other day looking for a review for a self-published graphic novel, which I won’t name because that isn’t the point, but it came from outside the traditional comic industry. The email didn’t bother to answer the questions I request from review submissions, instead sending me to their website. That’s ok, I don’t want to be dogmatic about following my guidelines, so I clicked over only to find all glossy taglines and video teaser, no actual information. […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Pushing Balloon Babes on Me

Between conventions and email, lately I’ve been given the push sell by a couple of different guys. The one thing they had in common was that they were trying to get me to try comics that were being promoted primarily with images of balloon-busted, barely clothed “female” grotesqueries. (I’m talking here about Jim Balent-level caricature, not just the standard Witchblade-style exposure.) They have every right to plaster their covers and promotional material with these helium hussies, of course, and in […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: New Technology Is No Longer News

I don’t have a specific press release to show you for this topic, because I’ve gotten too many of them that say basically the same thing: “Hey, my comic/graphic novel that didn’t sell before/you’ve never heard of is going to be on the iPhone!” How nice for you. I don’t have an iPhone, so I don’t really care. I know lots of people do, though, and that’s why there are now something like 100,000 apps out there for that platform. […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Reading Like a Time Capsule

I got an email about a new anthology of alternative comics from the UK. Reading through it, I started having flashbacks to last decade: Just a short email to let you know that Solipsistic Pop — an anthology that features the very best in alternative UK comics — has launched its website with a manifesto that states the intentions of a new wave of comic artists taking over the UK alternative scene. There was more about the anthology, due in […]

Read more

PR: What Not to Do: Insulting Those You Want to Help You

Note to aspiring web writers: if you want me to mention your website, especially with a link, then don’t be an ass. I got a press release from someone who will go unnamed who thought the following approaches were the right way to go: 1. Making outrageous claims. We’re “one of the only, if not the only, dedicated graphic novel review websites.” 2. Asking you to take too much on faith. The reviewer is anonymous, although claiming to be a […]

Read more
1 2 3 4