Alphabetical Index of NBM / Papercutz

Hank Ketcham’s Dennis The Menace Volume 1: The Cult-Classic Comicbooks by Al Wiseman & Fred Toole

Review by KC Carlson Dennis the Menace, the classic American comics panel by Hank Ketcham, debuted in 1951, introducing tiny terror Dennis Mitchell (based on Ketcham’s own four-year-old son) and his family: father Henry (sometimes “Hank” — who remarkably resembled creator Hank Ketcham), mother Alice, and oversized mutt Ruff. Before long, there was also a whole neighborhood of kids, frightened-for-their-life babysitters, and exasperated neighbors (mostly just George (“Mr.”) Wilson… his wife Martha quite liked Dennis and constantly provided freshly-baked cookies). […]

Read more

Louise Brooks: Detective

Rick Geary, the artist behind the acclaimed Twentieth Century Murder true-crime graphic novel series, takes a side step into fiction with a strong historical flavor in Louise Brooks: Detective. In real life, the distinctive actress, who starred in Pandora’s Box and popularized the severe dark bob hairdo, returned home to Wichita, Kansas, to run a dance studio in 1940. Her Hollywood career was over, for a combination of reasons, including her dislike of the industry. And the country had changed […]

Read more

Fires Above Hyperion

Fires Above Hyperion could have been impressive to read, but poor design choices and overly familiar material make it a waste of time. The color scheme is lovely, with rust, deep turquoise, olive, and the occasional purple. However, by choosing to use black type on these saturated colors, the book is often difficult to read, with the text blending into the background hue. You can see some of what I mean in this preview page, but it doesn’t show later […]

Read more

Lulu Anew

Lulu Anew tackles a topic not often seen in the young adult male-focused American comic industry: the soul-sucking mundanity of life as a housewife. Lulu leaves a job interview knowing that she didn’t get the position. Her time away from the workforce to raise three children makes her undesirable. Instead of going home, she realizes how unhappy she is and how she’s taken for granted, so she wanders to the coast, where she spends time with a man she meets […]

Read more

Street View

Pascal Rabaté’s Street View is a fascinating art object, a creative take on storytelling that uses format to drive the reader’s attention. It’s an accordion book, a set of painted double-page spreads between two cardboard boards that can be read through one way, showing daytime scenes, and then flipped over to see the evenings. Each sheds new light on the others. Each image is a straight-on shot of four buildings. As in Hitchcock’s Rear Window, we watch the inhabitants across […]

Read more

A Treasury of Victorian Murder Compendium II

If you haven’t had the pleasure of trying Rick Geary’s Treasury of Victorian Murder series, this new omnibus volume is a wonderful starting point. For those of us, like me, who have long recommended these explorations of sometimes-unsolved mysteries of long ago, the handsome hardcover is a delightful way to be reminded of author Rick Geary’s skill. This substantial volume contains five books’ worth of material: The Borden Tragedy, The Mystery of Mary Rogers, The Saga of the Bloody Benders, […]

Read more

All Star by Jesse Lonergan

Carl Carter is a small-town baseball star in his senior year of high school in 1998. He’s about to get a scholarship for college ball. He knows how valuable he’s considered, and as a result, he treats those around him with disregard. He relies on his brother to do his work, ignores his father, and skates on schoolwork. His best friend Esden parties with him, but Esden doesn’t have the skills that excuse this frat-boy-like behavior. Then the two make […]

Read more

Madison Square Tragedy: The Murder of Stanford White (A Treasury of XXth Century Murder)

Although Stanford White was murdered by a jealous husband over a hundred years ago (in 1906), the case Rick Geary portrays in his newest Treasury of XXth Century Murder, Madison Square Tragedy: The Murder of Stanford White, feels very modern. Rick Geary’s art is amazing in setting the stage in a booming New York City at the beginning of the 20th century, a growing metropolis struggling with conflicts among new money, established society, changing urban life, recent technologies, and burgeoning […]

Read more
1 2 3 4 5 7