Search Results for: lucy knisley

Something New: Tales From a Makeshift Bride

Lucy Knisley’s latest autobiographical tour-de-force expands beyond the food memoirs and travelogues she’s known for by tackling one of the biggest events in many women’s lives: her wedding. Something New: Tales From a Makeshift Bride takes a very modern approach. As is true of many young women, Knisley is ambivalent about the many traditions around the ceremony and the costs involved. In this graphic memoir, she works through her qualms about the history of the ceremony as marking women as […]

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Displacement: A Travelogue

Displacement is a followup to Lucy Knisley’s previous travelogue, An Age of License, but this time, instead of portraying a young woman starting her life, she tackles the end. She describes the difference like this: “That trip was about independence, sex, youth, and adventure. This trip is about patience, care, mortality, respect, sympathy, and love.” Knisley accompanies her grandparents on a cruise for the elderly, and Displacement is her journal about taking care of them while they travel. In her […]

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An Age of License: A Travelogue

Lucy Knisley is one of my favorite comic artists. I haven’t read a book of hers I didn’t like, which means each new title comes with greater expectations. An Age of License is the first of two travel memoirs by her coming from Fantagraphics, and I’m pleased that it’s as good as I hoped. It’s set in 2011, when Lucy went to a Norwegian comic festival. Along the way, she went to France to visit her mother, who was vacationing […]

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Relish: My Life in the Kitchen

I have wanted, for several months, to tell you how much I enjoyed reading Lucy Knisley’s new food autobiography, Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, as I hoped I would. However, it was so good that I was afraid to try telling you how and why; I didn’t feel that any of my words could live up to the book’s quality or capture how much I enjoyed the read. Relish explores food as memory and meaning. In chapters punctuated with […]

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Make Yourself Happy

One of my favorite C2E2 purchases was the latest volume from Lucy Knisley, reprinting over 200 pages of her black-and-white diary comics in Make Yourself Happy. It’s the followup to Radiator Days, similar in content but more recent, covering the past two years. In it, she reprints her hourly comics from 2009 and 2010. (Every Wednesday in January, she draws two-panel comics every hour to show how her day is progressing.) There are also a number of references to French […]

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Drawn to You

I had the pleasure of discovering the work of both Lucy Knisley (Radiator Days) and Erika Moen (DAR) this year. So imagine my glee when I discovered that the two had teamed up for this conversational comic collaboration. The two artists passed the pages back and forth between themselves over a period of about six months. Via the internet, they drew themselves talking to each other, but it’s the subjects they cover that make this fascinating. They talk about deciding […]

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French Milk

Lucy Knisley and her mother went to Paris for a month in 2007, and the result was French Milk, Lucy’s drawn travel journal. The two women were each facing their own turning points. Her mother was going to be 50, and Lucy was turning 22 and facing the questions of adulthood. Her preparations demonstrate her youthful view of what’s important: she barely learns the language, but she succeeds at taking up smoking, to better hang out in cafes. She’s struggling […]

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Radiator Days

I don’t remember how I found Lucy Knisley’s art journal. As soon as I saw it, though, I knew I needed to read more of her work. Her style is so cool. She does slice-of-life material for the most part, punctuated with unique pop culture references, but in a lovely, clear line style with a vibrant sense of color. Radiator Days contains two years’ worth of her comic strips, over 300 pages of sketches, observations, comic journals, and stories. Although […]

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