Deb Aoki, Brigid Alverson, Erica Friedman, Heidi MacDonald, and I Talk Manga

I have been remiss in not linking to this before now. In the time frame of what would have been the New York Comic Con in mid-October, Deb Aoki, Brigid Alverson, Erica Friedman, Heidi MacDonald, and I did a livestream where we talked about manga for over an hour. It was a lot of fun! Deb, Brigid, and Erica read a lot more in that format than I do these days, and I got some good suggestions of titles to […]

Read more

Calpico in America

If you’ve read any amount of manga or have an interest in Japanese culture, you’ve likely heard of Calpis. If nothing else, it’s one of those names that are accidentally funny in English, because of the sound. The actual beverage is a fruity, non-carbonated drink with a hint of yogurt. (It’s made through lactic acid fermentation.) It was first launched in 1919, it comes in several flavors, and it’s now more widely available in the US! It’s owned by Asahi, […]

Read more

Murder Is a Must

Murder Is a Must by Marty Wingate is the sequel to The Bodies in the Library. As with the first, the mystery is set in a library dedicated to female mystery authors, and the murder is loosely connected to a classic mystery. In this case, it’s Dorothy L. Sayers’ Murder Must Advertise. I loved the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries, and Murder Must Advertise is one of the best, as he’s at his most whimsical in it. The dilettante peer has […]

Read more

Free Comic Book Day Summer

No one cares about this any more, with everything else going on, but just for historical purposes: Back in March, I asked “what will happen to Free Comic Book Day?” At that time, they were expecting that they’d have to reschedule from May to later in the year once the pandemic was under control. As we know now, due to idiots who think “freedom!” can contradict scientific fact and a ridiculous lack of political leadership, we’re still in it. So […]

Read more

The Watson Chronicles

I tried The True Adventures of Sherlock Holmes because of a recommendation from someone in my Sherlockian group. I enjoyed it so much I went wandering through the rest of the books publisher Gasogene Books has put out and decided to try a more straightforward story with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. The Watson Chronicles by Anne Margaret Lewis, subtitled “A Sherlock Holmes Novel in Stories”, was another great read. Six stories tell of how John Watson, a fifty-year-old in […]

Read more

Newer Streaming Services Have Older Content

Which is a good thing, if you ask me. Because I like older movies. And to me, a “classic” is 1940s, not 1980s, as I’ve seen it used recently. Courtesy of JustWatch.com comes this infographic. You’ll note that the studio streaming services — Disney+, Peacock, and HBO Max — are the newer kids on the block but have a longer tail and thus an older average content age. But then, the companies behind them have been around a lot longer […]

Read more

A Question of Holmes

Turns out that the trilogy that began with A Study in Charlotte now has four books. I read A Question of Holmes, the final, in the hopes that it would resolve some of the many tangles built up so far. (The cast became too large in the second, The Last of August. I think I read the third, The Case for Jamie, but I don’t recall much about it and definitely didn’t like it.) I was distinctly disappointed. The characters […]

Read more

Lunatic, Out December, Blends Art Book and Story Wordlessly

In December, Fanfare Presents will be publishing Lunatic by Dan Mazur. It’s a 200-page hardcover where every page is a wordless single image, combining into the story of a woman who loves the moon. Dan put out this video to show and tell about the book, which uses a variety of art styles. I wish more people explained their projects so clearly and directly, with plenty of sample pages. The word “lunatic” derives from Latin, meaning “of the moon” or […]

Read more
1 2 3 4 561