Rachel Nabors: 18 Revolutions, Crow Princess, Subculture of One

Rachel Nabors is a one-woman creative force. Her self-publishing comics career began with 18 Revolutions, a small 80-page book responsible for her claim that she was “the first female American teenager to self-publish a graphic novel”. Could very well be, as far as I know. It collects strips she created from the ages of 15 through 18. When I reviewed it back in the summer of 2004, I said this: She uses a cute manga-influenced style that is well-suited to […]

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The Perhapanauts: Second Chances

I hadn’t realized how much I’d missed these characters (previously seen in First Blood) until I picked up this new collection of their adventures, which I loved. Team leader (and psychic) Arisia was incapacitated at the end of the last book after having been attacked by a vampire, so her teammates need to get her medical attention. Meanwhile, demon piranha creatures from another dimension are attacking headquarters. The life-and-death circumstances necessitate the team splitting up, and their individual choices demonstrate […]

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Harlequin Violet: Response

Response is a faithful adaptation of a Harlequin romance novel by Penny Jordan. It was one of the first releases in the Ginger Blossom line published by Dark Horse. Purple means that it’s aimed older, with “more sophisticated” content. The pink books were geared younger (no sex), and both were printed in ink colors that matched their name. (The purple’s not bad to read, if a tad unusual, but I found the hot pink headache-inducing.) Both imprints released three titles […]

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Finder: The Rescuers

After the societal digression of Mystery Date, The Rescuers returns more directly to the adventures of Jaeger, this time in a detective story. His American Indian-like clan is camping on the grounds of an urban estate owned by a nouveau riche lord. On the evening of a large party, the baron’s baby son is stolen and later found dead. Obviously, there are echoes of the Lindbergh kidnapping, one of the defining stories of the twentieth century, but the tale has […]

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It Rhymes With Lust

In 1950, when this graphic novel was first published, It Rhymes With Lust was a much racier title than it seems today. To modern ears, the reaction might be a mild annoyance — What rhymes with lust? Why not come out and say what you’re hinting at? Then, the spicy allusion promised a whole different kind of world, one driven by the kind of base motivations polite people didn’t even know about, let alone voice. The answer is Rust Masson, […]

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Clubbing

Wow. The first-ever Andi Watson book I’ve been disappointed in.1 I thought the premise of Clubbing — London goth gets sent to stay with her grandparents in the country; she sees it as punishment, we know it’s a chance for her to grow up and learn core values — had potential. Goodness knows it’s well-worn and -loved in a certain kind of teen novel. But both the plotting and the art are mediocre. Artist Josh Howard is apparently only capable […]

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Flower of Life Volume 3

As with volume 2, Flower of Life volume 3 wasn’t what I expected. In fact, it’s beginning to remind me of the author’s previous series Antique Bakery in that she’s treating it almost as an anthology. The loose framework she’s set up allows her to tell a variety of stories, and the subjects she chooses tend to be a bit more diverse than the usual shojo. Sumiko, the manga artist from the previous volume, goes shopping with classmates in a […]

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Divalicious! Volume 1

Divalicious! is a frothy, episodic ramble through the life of a self-obsessed teen pop star. Tina’s got it all — career, fans, a rival, and manager Shaquille. Watching her overreact to all of it is hilarious. Writer T Campbell (Penny and Aggie) covers the gamut of modern celebrity culture in content-packed chapters, while Amy Mebberson’s art more than keeps up with how over-the-top everything is. Her characters are friendly, even when they’re self-absorbed or stupid. Tina’s into every trend, whether […]

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