Classic Story Adaptations

This list contains comic adaptations of Sherlock Holmes stories written by the original author, Arthur Conan Doyle, arranged by original publication date.

The Hound of the BaskervillesThe Hound of the Baskervilles 2014

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Stone Arch Books, 2008, reissued 2014) is a simplified retelling with modernized language by Martin Powell, illustrated by Daniel Ferran. The ending (spoiler) has been changed to show Holmes trying to pull Stapleton from the mire but failing. Other omissions make for a shorter read, one intended to be more suitable for a younger audience. The book also includes a glossary, discussion questions, and writing prompts, for school usage.

Sherlock Holmes graphic novels from SelfMadeHero (older versions)

The Sign of the Four is one of four adaptations of the Arthur Conan Doyle novels by Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard (Sterling, 2009-2011; reprinted by SelfMadeHero with new covers (shown below) and in a smaller trim size, 2017).

The series is recommended, particularly for purists, as it is a faithful adaptation and uses Doyle’s words for the characters. (Although some have issues with the caricature-style art, particularly Holmes’ large chin.) If you care to track them down:

Title Publication Date ISBN
The Hound of the Baskervilles 2009 9781906838003
A Study in Scarlet 2010 9781906838010
The Sign of the Four 2010 9781906838041
The Valley of Fear 2011 9781906838058
The Hound of the Baskervilles 2017 9781910593325
A Study in Scarlet 2017 9781910593332
The Sign of the Four 2017 9781910593356
The Valley of Fear 2017 9781910593349

Sherlock Holmes graphic novels from SelfMadeHero

The Hound of the Baskervilles from Campfire Graphic Novels

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Campfire Graphic Novels, 2010, adapted by J.R. Parks, illustrated by Vinod Kumar) is a modified adaptation that emphasizes violence and drama, changing events from the actual story to instead include more action and danger.

Sherlock Holmes and a Scandal in BohemiaSherlock Holmes and the Adventure at the Abbey GrangeSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Blue GemSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Dancing MenSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Speckled BandSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Sussex VampireSherlock Holmes and the Redheaded LeagueSherlock Holmes and the Adventure at the Copper BeechesSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Six NapoleonsSherlock Holmes and the Boscombe Valley MysterySherlock Holmes and the Adventure of Black PeterSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Cardboard BoxSherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Three GarridebsSherlock Holmes and the Gloria Scott

On the Case with Holmes and Watson (Lerner Publishing Graphic Universe, 2010-2012) is a series of 14 slim books (48 pages), each covering a canonical story. They’re adapted by Murray Shaw and M.J. Cosson and illustrated by Sophie Rohrbach (and JT Morrow beginning with #7). Although the language is simplified, it maintains the flavor of the period. Each book also includes a text page with explanations of the case. They’re clearly created for the school/library market, which is why I find it funny that one of the cases is the Cardboard Box, with the severed ears. Some of them are surprisingly hard to find outside of that market but worth tracking down. Overall, a nice range showing the appeal of the characters and stories.

The Adventure of Abbey GrangeThe Adventure of the Blue CarbuncleThe Adventure of the Cardboard BoxThe Adventure of the Copper BeechesThe Adventure of the Dancing MenThe Adventure of the Dying DetectiveThe Adventure of the Empty HouseThe Adventure of the Engineer's ThumbThe Adventure of the Norwood BuilderThe Adventure of the Priory SchoolThe Adventure of the Red CircleThe Adventure of the Red-Headed LeagueThe Adventure of the Second StainThe Adventure of the Six NapoleonsThe Adventure of the Solitary CyclistThe Adventure of the Speckled BandThe Adventure of the Three StudentsThe Adventure of Wisteria Lodge

The Graphic Novel Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Magic Wagon/Graphic Planet, 2010-2013) similarly consists of 18 volumes, with the original stories adapted by Vincent Goodwin and illustrated by Ben Dunn (founder of Antarctic Press and a leading artist of the “Amerimanga” movement). The stories are rewritten and restructured, presumably for a younger audience, with emphasis primarily on plot. Most of the details are told through dialogue, and Holmes and Watson are drawn as younger men (although with the short, 40-page story length, there’s not much Watson in many of them). I enjoyed the action approach and the streamlined storytelling. These are fun reads that focus on the plot twists and mystery reveals, and it’s interesting to see some less frequently-adapted choices.

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Dark Horse)

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Dark Horse Books / Sequential Pulp Comics, 2013, by Martin Powell and Jamie Chase) changes the story, particularly the ending, and appears to have been poorly assembled using layers of photo reference.

Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles

Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Dover Graphic Novel Classics, 2014) is a curiosity, as it’s intended to be used as a coloring book, so the art is very sparse. It’s all outlines, with no shading, and with much repetition of images (mostly heads and faces).

A Scandal In Bohemia: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel

A Scandal In Bohemia: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel (2014) is one of three volumes by Petr Kopl translated from Czech and put out by MX Publishing. This book also includes a version of “The Speckled Band”. Kopl has a fun, jokey approach to the stories, with plenty of action and period cameos, including Phileas Fogg, Dorian Grey, and Frankenstein’s monster.

The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel

The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel (2014) is a fairly faithful retelling, continuing with the comedy tone and various additions, as well as an excellent use of clever visuals. Cameos in this volume include Professor Challenger, Jonathan Harker, and Dr. Jekyll.

The Final Problem: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel

The Final Problem: A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel (2015) concludes the trilogy. It also includes the stories “Charles Augustus Milverton” and “The Empty House”. There is reference to a fourth book, The Devil’s Foot, that has not been translated into English.

Dark Tales: The Hound of the Baskervilles

Dark Tales: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Canterbury Classics, 2018, illustrated by Dave Shephard) is a flat, unexciting version of the classic novel that ends with a fight between Holmes and Stapleton.

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Usborne Graphic Classics)

That same year, thankfully, also brought the much better The Hound of the Baskervilles (Usborne Graphic Classics, 2018, adapted by Russell Punter, illustrated by Andrea da Rold). It’s a mostly faithful version, attractive and very readable, and the best choice for younger readers.

Page from The Speckled Band from The Graphic Canon of Crime and Mystery Volume 1

The Graphic Canon of Crime and Mystery Volume 1 (Seven Stories Press, 2017) contains a 14-page version of “The Speckled Band” adapted by Suzy Kim and illustrated by Patrick Gabrielli. (This volume also has a version of the Arcène Lupin story “Sherlock Holmes Arrives Too Late” adapted by Jane Mai.)

Mr Doyle's Class Presents A Study in Scarlet

Mr Doyle’s Class Presents A Study in Scarlet (Portsmouth City Council, 2020) is a wonderful recontextualization of the original novel. The goal is to present the story for a modern audience, accomplished by showing a school class putting it on as a play while they talk about the history and meaning of the work.

Page from A Scandal in Bohemia from The Graphic Canon of Crime and Mystery Volume 2

The Graphic Canon of Crime and Mystery Volume 2 (Seven Stories Press, 2021) contains a 10-page version of “A Scandal in Bohemia” by Lara Antal and Dave Kelly.

Comic Classics: Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles

Comic Classics: Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles (Farshore, 2021, abridged by Lucy Courtenay, designed and illustrated by Jack Noel) is not really a comic, but a retelling in the popular illustrated diary format made popular by Diary of a Wimpy Kid. It’s enjoyable, both creepy and funny, maintaining the classic spookiness with a modern overlay and a lot of electric lime green coloring.