The Bodies in the Library

The Bodies in the Library takes place against a background based on the long history of female-written mysteries, which is highlighted through a lead character who hasn’t read any of them. I found this an odd choice, but I loved the setting. Hayley Burke is the new curator for the First Edition Society, established when a rich woman who collected books by the women who wrote during the Golden Age of Mystery passed away. Hayley doesn’t know anything about Agatha […]

Read more

Tokyo: Day by Day

In another time, Tokyo: Day by Day would be an amazing guidebook to use to prepare for a visit to one of the world’s most vibrant, exciting cities. These days, it’s more of a wish book and a reminder of what it was like to be able to travel. Either way, the book promises “356 Things to See and Do!”, and it provides. Each day is a page that highlights a restaurant, a unique store, a museum (for snowglobes! or […]

Read more

Young Charlotte, Filmmaker

I was reminded how much I enjoyed Frank Viva’s work during a recent re-read of A Trip to the Bottom of the World With Mouse, so I thought I’d check out some of his other picture books. I should have done that earlier, since Young Charlotte, Filmmaker was perfect for me. Produced by The Museum of Modern Art in New York, it’s the story of a young woman who adores black and white and makes her own movies. Sometimes she’s […]

Read more

Back Issue #120 Has LSH Info, Interview With KC

Legion of Super-Heroes fans, you’ll want to make sure to check out Back Issue #120, an issue of the comic history magazine dedicated to “heroes of tomorrow” — which means lots of Legion! KC Carlson (my husband and former long-running LSH editor) was interviewed for the lead article, a history of Mon-El/Valor. KC remembers how he first hired Adam Hughes and Stuart Immonen. Writer John Wells also talked to Mark Waid for the piece (and magazine editor Michael Eury is […]

Read more

Doctor Who: The Runaway TARDIS

The latest Pop Classics storybook from Quirk Books is my favorite. Doctor Who: The Runaway TARDIS is, as with the others, illustrated by Kim Smith, who has a gorgeous, approachable, colorful style. The other credit is “based on the series by Chris Chibnall”, which means it’s the thirteenth Doctor, with a likeness to Jodie Whittaker. I’ve previously covered The Karate Kid and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and this follows the same pattern: The movie books retell the story, but the […]

Read more

The Definition of Superhero (As Seen Through Transmetropolitan’s Spider Jerusalem)

Several years ago, I contributed an essay to Shot in the Face: A Savage Journey to the Heart of Transmetropolitan, a collection of writings published by Sequartabout the science fiction comic series. My particular topic was “Spider Jerusalem: Super-Hero of the Future?” In that piece, I looked at how one defines a superhero and whether the Warren Ellis-written journalist character qualified. I thought I’d excerpt some key parts here, mostly because I’ve missed arguing online. (I have lightly reedited the […]

Read more

My Dad Thinks I’m a Boy?!

My Dad Thinks I’m a Boy?! is a trans positive children’s book by Sophie Labelle that shows the reader what it’s like to be a trans child with an unaccepting parent. Stephie is seven years old and clear on who she is and what she likes. Her dad wants her to be Stephen and go fishing with him because that’s what her father likes, even though it makes her sad. The flipped perspective, where the father is childish and stubborn […]

Read more

Jack Kirby’s Dingbat Love

Unpublished ‘70s Stories by the King of Comics! Review by KC Carlson Somehow this amazing book from TwoMorrows managed to literally slip through the cracks between what’s laughably known as my desk and a wall — until I was reminded that I hadn’t read or reviewed it yet. After finding it, I was ashamed that I had misplaced this incredible (and fun!) look at Kirby’s odds and ends from DC Comics that hadn’t been collected yet. I appreciated seeing a […]

Read more
1 2 3 35