Alphabetical Index of Other Publishers

Secret Weapons #1

Every so often, a superhero comic reminds me that they can still come up with interesting ideas to explore. Valiant’s Secret Weapons gave me the kind of genre book I enjoy: a mismatched team of people with wacky powers figuring out how to get along. It’s written by Eric Heisserer and illustrated by Raúl Allén and Patricia Martin. The Willows was a secret location where a crazy rich guy parked those with superpowers he thought were losers. He activated a […]

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Invisible Emmie

As long-time readers know, I’m not a big fan of the illustrated diary book format. There’s nothing wrong with kids reading them, but I don’t care for them being promoted as comics. Terri Libenson’s Invisible Emmie does something fun with the concept, though. It combines the illustrated diary format with comics to contrast different approaches to middle school. Emmie is a regular, everyday kid. She’s not popular, not an outcast, just quiet, and she likes to draw. Going to school […]

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Roughneck

After making his name with the award-winning Essex County, cartoonist Jeff Lemire moved in the last decade to superhero work for corporate publishers. (His latest books for Image, Plutona, and Dark Horse, Black Hammer, have combined both superhero genre conventions and his focus on small character moments in a hybrid of his past efforts.) With Roughneck, though, he’s returned to the closely observed tales of Canadian country life that first brought him to attention. Derek Ouelette was a star hockey […]

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Monster: A Graphic Novel Adaptation of a Jonathan Kellerman Novel

I hadn’t realized this series was continuing. Five years ago, the first Jonathan Kellerman graphic novel adaptation, Silent Partner, was published. It was based on the fourth in his Alex Delaware book series about a psychologist who solves murders. In 2014, The Web came out, jumping ahead to the 10th book. Since it’s set on a restricted island, one might assume that it was chosen for the visual possibilities, but given the density of the work, most of the panels […]

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Margaret and the Moon

Margaret and the Moon: How Margaret Hamilton Saved the First Lunar Landing is a new picture book that I read because it’s illustrated by one of my favorite artists, Lucy Knisley. It’s written by Dean Robbins. Now, as an adult reader, once I read the subtitle, I pretty much had covered the whole book. It’s only 36 pages, and the content is about how Margaret Hamilton was curious, studied math, and didn’t let people saying “girls don’t do that” stop […]

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Secret Smithsonian Adventures: It’s Treason, by George!

The Secret Smithsonian Adventures line (aimed at 8-to-12-year-olds) continues this October with its third entry. After tackling the history of invention with the Wright Brothers and natural history with a world where dinosaurs survived, this latest installment looks at American political history. It’s Treason, by George! is particularly timely (and scary) as the kids return from their previous adventure to find that the country is now a monarchy and some of their parents are under house arrest for sedition for […]

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The New Ghost

The New Ghost by Robert Hunter is another in Nobrow’s line of single-issue author spotlights. It’s been out for more than five years, but I only found out about it recently through, of all things, a well-targeted Amazon recommendation. (Sometimes the computers get it right.) And since it’s a stand-alone, it doesn’t matter when you read it. Our unnamed protagonist is the new ghost of the title, following his companions through pages of deep blue night populated by faceless, formless […]

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Roller Girl

One side effect of Raina Telgemeier’s dominance of the graphic novel market for young people is the need to be able to answer the question, “What do I read next?” I recommend Svetlana Chmakova’s Awkward, but Victoria Jamieson’s Roller Girl is also quite popular with that audience. Astrid is best friends with Nicole. They go together to a roller derby match, and Astrid loves it, but Nicole isn’t so sure. They’re growing apart, anyway, in other ways, with Nicole more […]

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